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Although some oil lubricants (like the slim strip on the razor in our top photo) are used at reasonably cool and constant temperatures, many have to work in engines and machines at very high temperatures. Car engines use thick, syrupy oils for lubrication because these stay liquid at over 300°C (570°F), which is hot enough to survive the kind of temperatures that engine parts heat up to. Water would quickly evaporate and turn to steam in those conditions but it also makes metal parts turn rusty, so it's not really a good choice for a lubricant. for that you need a good bengkel mobil di jakarta

Often, lubricants have to work well at a range of temperatures.zoho For example, in a chilly country like Iceland or Switzerland, car axle lubricants need to do their job both when the car is just starting from cold and when it's been running for a while. In practice, that could mean a wide range of operating temperatures from -10°C to 100°C (-14 to 212°F). Lubricants are much like any other substance: the colder they get, the harder, more solid, and page  less fluid (more viscous or "treacly") they become. Sometimes, that means they work less effectively: the poorer performance of wix lubricants at lower temperatures is one of the reasons why engines and transmissions are less efficient before they've properly warmed up.